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Few heart patients use cardiac rehab after stenting

(Reuters Health) - Just one in three patients enrolls in recommended cardiac rehabilitation after having a blocked heart artery cleared and a stent inserted, a Michigan study suggests.
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Northeast Congo insecurity hampers response to measles outbreak

Insecurity in northeast Congo has hampered a measles vaccination drive and forced people to flee their homes, local responders said on Wednesday, complicating efforts to control the spread of a virus that has killed more people that Ebola this year.
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Medical News Today: Can people die from rheumatoid arthritis?

A person cannot die directly as a result of rheumatoid arthritis, but the condition can lead to life-threatening health complications. Learn about the factors involved and methods of preventing complications here.
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More than a third of people in the Americas may have obstructive sleep apnea

(Reuters Health) - Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may affect as many as 37% of adults in North, Central and South America, according to a review of epidemiological studies presented June 9 at Sleep 2019, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional...
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Medical News Today: Can turmeric help treat rheumatoid arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic condition that causes pain and swelling in the joints. A growing body of scientific research suggests that turmeric and one of its main compounds, curcumin, may help alleviate symptoms of RA. Learn more here.
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Medical News Today: How vitamin D helps fight treatment-resistant cancer

Two active forms of vitamin D can kill treatment-resistant cancer cells by blocking a way that the cells pump out chemotherapy drugs, a new study shows.
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Lack of sleep linked to mental health problems for college students

(Reuters Health) - Poor sleep may be linked to a greater risk for poor mental health on college campuses, new research suggests.
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Eroding trust in vaccines leaves populations vulnerable, global study finds

Trust in vaccines - one of the world's most effective and widely-used medical products - is highest in poorer countries but weaker in wealthier ones where skepticism has allowed outbreaks of diseases such as measles to persist, a global study found on ...
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Medical News Today: Lyme disease: Why does joint pain persist?

Lyme disease can cause long-term joint inflammation that lasts long after the body has cleared the infection. A new study uncovers how this might happen.
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Explainer: Mysterious 'brain fever' killing children in India

More than 110 children in India, most from poor rural families, have died this month from encephalitis, a type of brain disease that has afflicted the eastern state of Bihar for more than two decades.
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Medical News Today: Are dogs better at detecting cancer 'than advanced technology?'

In a new study, beagles were able to detect the presence of cancer with extremely high accuracy. Could their 'sniff skills' lead to novel screening tests?
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Euthanasia law takes effect in Australia's Victoria state

Voluntary euthanasia became legal in the Australian state of Victoria on Wednesday, with the government saying it had extensive safeguards to prevent the process being misused while allowing people a compassionate choice over how they die.
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Medical News Today: Atrial fibrillation may raise dementia risk by 50%

According to the largest research of its kind yet, atrial fibrillation may raise the risk of dementia even in people who did not experience a stroke.
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France leads the world in mistrust of vaccines

For Marie-Claire Grime, who works in a pharmacy northeast of Paris, questions about vaccines are a daily challenge. They come mainly from parents who say they're worried about "a lot of chemicals" being put into their children, she says. She does her b...
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Varying vaccine trust leaves populations vulnerable, global study finds

Trust in vaccines - one of the world's most effective and widely-used medical products - is highest in poorer countries but weaker in wealthier ones where skepticism has allowed outbreaks of diseases such as measles to persist, a global study found on ...
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Medical News Today: Rheumatoid factor: What to know

Rheumatoid factor is an immune system protein. Doctors can measure its levels using a blood test to help diagnose autoimmune conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we explain the test, normal rheumatoid factor ranges, and what the results me...
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Physical un-fitness linked with depression, anxiety in middle-aged women

(Reuters Health) - Mid-life women with weak upper and lower body fitness may be more prone to depression and anxiety, a study from Singapore suggests.
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Physical un-fitness linked with depression, anxiety in middle-aged women

(Reuters Health) - Mid-life women with weak upper and lower body fitness may be more prone to depression and anxiety, a study from Singapore suggests.
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Obesity-related pain contributes to opioid use

(Reuters Health) - Long-term use of prescription opioids for chronic pain is more common among people who are overweight or obese, a new study finds.
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Obesity-related pain contributes to opioid use

(Reuters Health) - Long-term use of prescription opioids for chronic pain is more common among people who are overweight or obese, a new study finds.
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Online pharmacy flags possible new impurity in blood pressure drug

Online pharmacy Valisure reported that it found a new cancer-causing impurity in some versions of widely prescribed blood pressure medicine valsartan, but U.S. regulators said on Tuesday that the amount in the drugs was well below levels deemed to be p...
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China suspending pork imports from third Canadian firm as dispute with Ottawa deepens

China will block pork imports from a third Canadian firm after a shipment was found to contain the banned feed additive ractopamine, the customs agency said on Tuesday, deepening a trade and diplomatic dispute with Canada.
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Medical News Today: Is decaf coffee harmful to health?

Decaffeinated coffee, or decaf, is similar to regular coffee but contains very little caffeine. Research suggests that drinking decaf is not harmful and may share some of the health benefits of regular coffee. Learn more here.
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Bringing photos to dermatology appointments can help

(Reuters Health) - More patients are bringing pictures of their skin problems to their dermatologists, which helps the doctors better observe the progression and potentially diagnose the condition, according to a new study.
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Medical News Today: What causes a lump on the areola

A lump on the areola may have a variety of causes, including skin irritation and bacteria. Treatments depend on the cause. Learn more about the causes and treatments of a lump on the areola here.
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Medical News Today: Is there a link between ADHD and dopamine?

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common behavioral disorder that can occur in both children and adults. Research suggests that there may be a link between a dopamine imbalance in the brain and the development of ADHD. Learn more here.
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Medical News Today: What is end-diastolic volume?

End-diastolic volume is how much blood is in the ventricles after the heart fills up with blood, but before it contracts to pump the blood around the body. Doctors use end-diastolic volume to calculate several different measurements of heart function. ...
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Medical News Today: What to know about status asthmaticus

Status asthmaticus is a life-threatening asthma state with symptoms that include anxiety, fatigue, and shortness of breath. An inhaler may not treat the symptoms, so a person should seek immediate medical treatment. Learn more here.
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U.S. teen suicides rising, especially among boys

For nearly a decade, suicide rates have been climbing among U.S. teens, with an especially pronounced increase in boys recently, a new study suggests.
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Medical News Today: Coronary heart disease may speed up cognitive decline

A study of adults aged 50 and over found that decline in memory and thinking was faster after a heart attack or angina, but not before.
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No provisions in USMCA to change U.S. pharmaceutical patent laws: Lighthizer

The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement has no provisions that would force changes to U.S. laws with respect to pharmaceutical companies, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said on Tuesday.
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Bayer asks trial judge to reverse $2 billion Roundup jury verdict

Bayer AG has asked a California judge to overrule a $2 billion verdict by jurors who found the company's glyphosate-based Roundup weed killer responsible for a couple's cancer, arguing the jury decision was not supported by evidence.
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Medical News Today: Garden snails may have secret weapons against aggressive bacteria

Researchers have discovered four previously unknown proteins in snail mucus, at least three of which have the potential to fight harmful bacteria.
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China to suspend pork imports from third Canadian firm as dispute with Ottawa deepens

China will block pork imports from a third Canadian firm after a shipment was found to contain the banned feed additive ractopamine, the customs agency said on Tuesday, deepening a trade and diplomatic dispute with Canada.
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Medical News Today: Diagnosing IBD: Noninvasive method trialed in mice

New research finds that immuno-PET imaging can accurately detect IBD in mice. The findings reveal information about specific inflammation mediators.
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Medical News Today: Scientists synthesize anticancer drug in 'landmark discovery'

In a 'landmark in drug discovery,' researchers achieved, for the first time, the total synthesis of a potent anticancer compound called halichondrin.
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Vietnam culls 2.5 million pigs to halt African swine fever outbreak: officials

Vietnam has culled more than 2.5 million pigs to contain the spread of an African swine fever outbreak that is in danger of infecting every province of the country, an agriculture ministry official said on Tuesday.
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Uganda clears three experimental Ebola treatments, watches for spread

Health workers have got the all-clear to use three experimental Ebola treatments in Uganda, a week after the deadly disease spread over the border from Democratic Republic of Congo, authorities said on Tuesday.
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China to suspend pork imports from Canadian company Frigo Royal

China will block pork imports from Canada's Frigo Royal Inc, after shipments by the Canadian firm were found to contain the banned feed additive ractopamine, the state Xinhua news agency reported on Tuesday.
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China to suspend pork imports from Canadian company Frigo Royal

China will block pork imports from Canada's Frigo Royal Inc after a batch of the Canadian firm's pork was found to contain the banned feed additive ractopamine, the customs agency said in a statement on its Wechat account on Tuesday.