(Reuters Health) - - Nearly one in 10 cancer patients treated with chemotherapy or newer targeted drugs may be hospitalized for serious kidney injury, a Canadian study suggests.
Johnson & Johnson said on Monday it plans to buy back up to $5 billion of its stock, after a Reuters report on Friday that the company knew for decades that its Baby Powder contained cancer-causing asbestos wiped about $40 billion from its market value.
When someone has food poisoning, they may want to limit themselves to a bland diet to avoid irritating the stomach further. Many people recommend the BRAT diet as a good one to follow after food poisoning. Learn more about the best foods and drinks to consume and avoid after food poisoning here.
(Reuters Health) - - Many boys want their fathers to be the ones to talk to them about condoms. But a new study offers fresh evidence of all the ways these conversations can be complicated and leave young men without a clear picture of how to have safe sex.
Kava kava is an herbal remedy that people use to relieve anxiety and promote sleep. However, there are concerns about its safety, as research suggests that it can cause serious liver damage. In this article, we will discuss the safety, uses, possible benefits, and best dosage of kava kava.
(Reuters Health) - - Kids who bring home report cards on Fridays may be more likely to experience child abuse afterward than kids who get their grades on other days, a U.S. study suggests.
Pork products sold at retailers in Brazil contain antibiotic-resistant bacteria, according to a study funded by animal rights group World Animal Protection (WAP), providing potential evidence of overuse of the medicines in food livestock.
Breast infections can happen for a variety of reasons. They are more common when a person is breastfeeding, but they can also affect people who are not. Learn more in this article.
Some people with endometriosis experience weight gain and bloating. In this article, we look at the possible reasons why and explain how to manage weight effectively.
(Reuters Health) - - While most parents heading out for alcohol-infused holiday parties will have arranged for child care while they're out and for transportation back home in case they become tipsy, one in four won't have put much thought into how they'll handle the kids if they have a hangover the next morning, a U.S. survey suggests.