Using mice, scientists have recently identified a mechanism independent of antibiotic use that can spread drug resistance among intestinal bacteria.

Scientists have exposed bacterial strains to cigarette smoke in the laboratory and found that the smoke increased the bacteria’s resistance to antibiotics.

Drug resistance is a large and growing problem. On the hunt for fresh sources of drugs, scientists have turned to the seaweed in underwater forests.

New research finds that triclosan, a compound that is in many consumer products, could make the bacteria it is supposed to kill stronger.

Dangerous, antibiotic-resistant bacteria present in remote Arctic soil indicate that superbugs have become a truly serious global threat, researchers warn.

Records of 19.2 million privately insured people show that 23.2 percent of antibiotic prescription fills in the United States in 2016 were inappropriate.

Newly identified bacteria in Irish soil long used in folk medicine stops growth of MRSA and three other superbugs behind antibiotic-resistant infections.

New research finds that an antibiotic derived from the spined soldier bug is effective against Escherichia coli and many other drug-resistant bacteria.

How does antibiotic use in animals affect drug resistance in humans? What role do intensive farming practices have in this dynamic? We investigate.

A simple way of linking vancomycin to an antimicrobial peptide led to a fivefold increase in the antibiotic’s power against an infectious bacterium.