New research in mice and cell cultures shows for the first time that a key circular RNA can block the spread of aggressive skin cancer.
Although obesity is a known risk factor for some cancers, its relationship with skin cancer has been harder to pin down. A recent study takes a fresh look.
Scientists have found that manipulating a cell signal, involving vitamin D, can slow the growth of melanoma cells and their advance to the lungs in mice.
Using a new mouse model of human melanoma, scientists show how the aggressive skin cancer can start in immature, pigment producing cells in hair follicles.
A new study suggests that people who have a higher vitamin A intake may have a lower risk of developing a common form of skin cancer.
Scientists find that fat cells transfer gene-altering proteins to melanoma cells, making them more aggressive. They also show a way to block this process.
Black people can get skin cancer, though it is less likely to affect them than people with lighter skin. For darker-skinned people, it usually occurs on lighter areas of the skin. Learn more here.
A Ph.D. student has designed a cost-effective and easy-to-use device that can quickly detect cancerous skin cells. Catching cancer earlier can save lives.
New research examines the genetic chain reaction that causes a particularly aggressive form of melanoma and finds a way to stop it.
A new study has finally identified a mechanism that allows skin cancer to become aggressive. The discovery also suggests a novel therapeutic approach.