A new study suggests that people who have a higher vitamin A intake may have a lower risk of developing a common form of skin cancer.
Scientists find that fat cells transfer gene-altering proteins to melanoma cells, making them more aggressive. They also show a way to block this process.
Black people can get skin cancer, though it is less likely to affect them than people with lighter skin. For darker-skinned people, it usually occurs on lighter areas of the skin. Learn more here.
A Ph.D. student has designed a cost-effective and easy-to-use device that can quickly detect cancerous skin cells. Catching cancer earlier can save lives.
New research examines the genetic chain reaction that causes a particularly aggressive form of melanoma and finds a way to stop it.
A new study has finally identified a mechanism that allows skin cancer to become aggressive. The discovery also suggests a novel therapeutic approach.
New research finds that therapy with a genetically modified herpes virus is highly effective in the treatment of stage 3 melanoma, with few side effects.
Recent research suggests that stopping the proteins LRP1 and tPA from interacting could form the basis of a treatment to halt metastasis in melanoma.
Nodular melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer. In this article, we look at the symptoms, causes, risk factors, and treatments for nodular melanoma.
New research reveals that antioxidants that bind to mitochondria — the main source of free radicals — either have no effect or cause tumors to grow faster.