Viral load is the amount of HIV per milliliter of blood. Antiretroviral therapy aims to reduce a person’s viral load to undetectable levels, where the virus is no longer transmittable. Here, we discuss what viral load and CD4 levels mean for a person living with HIV.

People living with HIV have a higher risk of developing mouth sores. Possible causes include viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, canker sores, and dry mouth. Learn more about the causes of HIV mouth sores and how to treat and prevent them here.

Some people with HIV are more likely to develop shingles. In this article, we look at the factors that increase a person’s risk, and cover treatments and possible complications.

A fever may be one of the initial symptoms of an acute HIV infection soon after exposure to the virus. In this article, learn about an HIV fever and other early symptoms.

There are many myths surrounding the transmission of HIV. A person can only transmit HIV through certain bodily fluids, including blood and semen. HIV is not present in other bodily fluids, such as saliva, tears, or sweat, so people cannot contract HIV through kissing. Learn more here.

HIV can affect anyone, and it may cause different symptoms in males and females. In this article, learn how HIV affects women and about the treatment options.

There are many myths about HIV and AIDS, including some about transmission. Developments in treatment mean that a person’s risk of contracting or transmitting HIV is significantly reduced. It is also vital to note that people cannot transmit AIDS, which develops from untreated HIV. Learn more.

After a person contracts HIV, seroconversion is the period during which the body starts producing detectable levels of HIV antibodies. Before this period, HIV tests usually give negative results. During seroconversion, a person may experience flu-like symptoms, such as a fever and body aches.