teleconsult

Teleradiology

Designing and delivering teleradiology services which meet your specific requirements is our forte. Our Board Certified radiologists offer preliminary, final and subspecialty reports 24/7/365. Turnaround times are set to match your needs. Our technical support center provides state of the art PACS/RIS and communication technology, which securely integrates with your current Information Systems.

Telepathology

Teleconsult pathologists offer services ranging from remote reporting of cyto- and histological cases, to lab design and quality assurance programs. We support the most basic lab set ups with second opinions and on-line consultations, and connect more advanced labs to our web based telepathology platform for routine reporting of diverse cases.

Telemicrobiology

Our telemicrobiology services are offered by Dutch and UK Board Certified clinical microbiologists with sub-specialties in the fields of general microbiology, bacteriology, virology, parasitology, mycology, molecular diagnostics and epidemiology. Our clinical microbiologists are mainly active in clinical hospital settings, keeping them closely connected and in tune with daily clinical situations and challenges. This creates affinity with remote cases and ensures the up-to-date knowledge our customers require.

Locum Placement

Our recruitment division recruits certified radiologists, pathologists and micro biologists for part time and full time positions. In our 15 year history we successfully recruited and placed medical specialists in over 60 hospitals and clinics across the globe

Screening & Trials

From its worldwide network of Board Certified medical specialists, TeleConsult creates subspecialty teams for specific screening and clinical trial assignments. In 2012 TeleConsult’s dedicated breast radiologists were selected by the Dutch Breast Cancer Screening program to interpret its screening mammography studies.

We are hiring

We recruit, select and place sub-specialty, EU educated and certified radiologists, pathologists and microbiologists for short and long term positions. Our reputation has been built on a foundation of providing highly skilled doctors and the following core values: Professionalism, Value for money, Quality, Reliability and Integrity. Interested in joining our team? Register now!

Specialist care at your fingertips

Whether you are a hospital  department, diagnostic center or laboratory, Teleconsult doctors and IT experts bring optimal efficiency to your  workflow. A thorough analysis of your current situation, needs and requirements results in a balanced work flow management plan.

Teleconsult does not have any volume requirement and you are in full control to decide when to outsource studies to a Teleconsult doctor. To find out how your clinic or department will benefit from working with Teleconsult Europe, please contact us.

  • INCREASE YOUR SUBSPECIALTY OFFERINGS

  • Balance on- and off site tasks

  • INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY AND PROFITABILITY

  • MAXIMUM USE OF RADIOLOGY AND LABORATORY EQUIPMENT

  • 24/7/365 AVAILABILITY OF EXPERTISE

About Teleconsult

Founded in 2007 by Dutch radiologists, TeleConsult Europe (TCE) offers radiology services to hospitals, clinics, diagnostic centers, laboratories, medical services companies and the Dutch Government.

TCE’s mission is to provide its customers with tailored telemedicine solutions. Since its inception, TCE carefully listened to wishes and needs of its clients. This resulted in an array of interchangeable services providing radiology and pathology departments with high quality, cost efficient, flexible on- and off-site solutions.

Today TCE’s solutions consist of a combination of an on-site physician workforce, teleradiology, telepathology, and IT services. Our Western Board certified radiologists and pathologists perform reading services for a broad array of institutions varying from a 24/7 emergency reading service for hospitals and clinics, to screening services for the famous Dutch Breast Cancer Screening Program.

The primary objective of our highly trained physicians and staff is to enable our clients to provide optimal patient care and diagnostic services by placing quality and value first. Our synergetic modules provide tailored services to hospitals, clinics and imaging centers at any location on the globe. Whether you need an on-site physician, reports through telemedicine or a combination of both, we help you to realize an optimal and cost efficient workflow.

Does radiation from X-rays and CT scans really cause cancer?

Studies purporting to show cancer link are badly flawed, researchers find

In recent years, there has been widespread media coverage of studies purporting to show that radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging causes cancer.

But such studies have serious flaws, including their reliance on an unproven statistical model, according to a recent article in the journal Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment. Corresponding author is Loyola University Medical Center radiation oncologist James Welsh, MS, MD.

"Although radiation is known to cause cancer at high doses and high-dose rates, no data have ever unequivocally demonstrated the induction of cancer following exposure to low doses and dose rates," Dr. Welsh and co-author Jeffry Siegel, PhD, write.

Studies that have found a cancer link to medical imaging typically employ a model called "linear no-threshold" (LNT). In LNT, the well-established cancer-causing effects of high doses of radiation are simply extrapolated downward in a straight line to low doses. The LNT model assumes there is no safe dose of radiation, no matter how small.

But although LNT is used by regulators around the world, the model "is of questionable validity, utility and applicability for estimation of cancer risks," Drs. Welsh and Siegel write.

Contrary to the LNT model, there is compelling evidence that the human body has evolved the ability to repair damage from low-dose radiation. For example, the mutation rate caused by low-dose background radiation in the environment is 2.5 million times lower than the rate of spontaneous mutations in the body. So even if the LNT model were true, the small increase in mutations caused by low-dose radiation from medical imaging would be unlikely to overwhelm the body's defenses.

Studies purporting to find a cancer link to medical imaging radiation have other flaws besides the questionable LNT model. For example, two recent studies suggested possible increased cancer risks from low-radiation doses associated with pediatric CT scans. But these cancers likely are due to the medical conditions that prompted the CT scans, and have nothing to do with the radiation exposure, Drs. Welsh and Siegel write.

While many people focus on the purported risks of radiation in medical imaging, "the more significant and actual risks associated with not undergoing an imaging procedure or undergoing a more invasive exploratory surgery are generally being ignored in both the scientific literature and the popular media," Drs. Welsh and Siegel write.



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Does radiation from X-rays and CT scans really cause cancer?

Studies purporting to show cancer link are badly flawed, researchers find

In recent years, there has been widespread media coverage of studies purporting to show that radiation from X-rays, CT scans and other medical imaging causes cancer.

But such studies have serious flaws, including their reliance on an unproven statistical model, according to a recent article in the journal Technology in Cancer Research & Treatment. Corresponding author is Loyola University Medical Center radiation oncologist James Welsh, MS, MD.

"Although radiation is known to cause cancer at high doses and high-dose rates, no data have ever unequivocally demonstrated the induction of cancer following exposure to low doses and dose rates," Dr. Welsh and co-author Jeffry Siegel, PhD, write.

Studies that have found a cancer link to medical imaging typically employ a model called "linear no-threshold" (LNT). In LNT, the well-established cancer-causing effects of high doses of radiation are simply extrapolated downward in a straight line to low doses. The LNT model assumes there is no safe dose of radiation, no matter how small.

But although LNT is used by regulators around the world, the model "is of questionable validity, utility and applicability for estimation of cancer risks," Drs. Welsh and Siegel write.

Contrary to the LNT model, there is compelling evidence that the human body has evolved the ability to repair damage from low-dose radiation. For example, the mutation rate caused by low-dose background radiation in the environment is 2.5 million times lower than the rate of spontaneous mutations in the body. So even if the LNT model were true, the small increase in mutations caused by low-dose radiation from medical imaging would be unlikely to overwhelm the body's defenses.

Studies purporting to find a cancer link to medical imaging radiation have other flaws besides the questionable LNT model. For example, two recent studies suggested possible increased cancer risks from low-radiation doses associated with pediatric CT scans. But these cancers likely are due to the medical conditions that prompted the CT scans, and have nothing to do with the radiation exposure, Drs. Welsh and Siegel write.

While many people focus on the purported risks of radiation in medical imaging, "the more significant and actual risks associated with not undergoing an imaging procedure or undergoing a more invasive exploratory surgery are generally being ignored in both the scientific literature and the popular media," Drs. Welsh and Siegel write.



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Breast cancer treatment with fewer potential side effects has equally good patient outcomes, UCLA study shows

A new study by UCLA scientists has found that women diagnosed with breast cancer and treated with a one-week regimen of partial breast radiation after the surgical removal of the tumor, or lumpectomy, saw no increase in cancer recurrence or difference in cosmetic outcomes compared to women who received radiation of the entire breast for a period of up to six weeks after surgery. The study is one of the largest ever done on partial breast irradiation.

The study lasted two decades and was led by Dr. Mitchell Kamrava, an assistant professor of radiation oncology at UCLA and member of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. Kamrava and his team found that with partial breast irradiation the total length of treatment can be reduced to a week because the smaller area of treatment allows for a higher dosage per treatment. Additionally, because partial breast radiation is more targeted, there is less exposure to vital organs like the lungs and the heart.

The new treatment, formally known as accelerated partial breast irradiation with interstitial multicatheter brachytherapy, works by radiating only breast tissue in and around the area where the tumor was removed. The current standard of care, called whole breast conservation therapy, involves irradiating the entire breast after surgery, usually over the course of five to seven weeks. This results in prolonged exposure to radiation and can potentially lead to more side effects.

"This gives us confidence there is a group of women who are suitable candidates for partial breast radiation and more women should discuss this treatment option with their doctors," said Kamrava.

The study followed over 1,000 women who received partial breast irradiation after surgery, with an average follow-up of about seven years.

The next phase for Kamrava and his team will be to analyze the results of randomized trials comparing whole breast versus partial breast irradiation.

The complete study is available online in the journal Annals of Surgical Oncology.



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