teleconsult

Teleradiology

Designing and delivering teleradiology services which meet your specific requirements is our forte. Our Board Certified radiologists offer preliminary, final and subspecialty reports 24/7/365. Turnaround times are set to match your needs. Our technical support center provides state of the art PACS/RIS and communication technology, which securely integrates with your current Information Systems.

Telepathology

Teleconsult pathologists offer services ranging from remote reporting of cyto- and histological cases, to lab design and quality assurance programs. We support the most basic lab set ups with second opinions and on-line consultations, and connect more advanced labs to our web based telepathology platform for routine reporting of diverse cases.

Telemicrobiology

Our telemicrobiology services are offered by Dutch and UK Board Certified clinical microbiologists with sub-specialties in the fields of general microbiology, bacteriology, virology, parasitology, mycology, molecular diagnostics and epidemiology. Our clinical microbiologists are mainly active in clinical hospital settings, keeping them closely connected and in tune with daily clinical situations and challenges. This creates affinity with remote cases and ensures the up-to-date knowledge our customers require.

Locum Placement

Our recruitment division recruits certified radiologists, pathologists and micro biologists for part time and full time positions. In our 15 year history we successfully recruited and placed medical specialists in over 60 hospitals and clinics across the globe

Screening & Trials

From its worldwide network of Board Certified medical specialists, TeleConsult creates subspecialty teams for specific screening and clinical trial assignments. In 2012 TeleConsult’s dedicated breast radiologists were selected by the Dutch Breast Cancer Screening program to interpret its screening mammography studies.

We are hiring

We recruit, select and place sub-specialty, EU educated and certified radiologists, pathologists and microbiologists for short and long term positions. Our reputation has been built on a foundation of providing highly skilled doctors and the following core values: Professionalism, Value for money, Quality, Reliability and Integrity. Interested in joining our team? Register now!

Specialist care at your fingertips

Whether you are a hospital  department, diagnostic center or laboratory, Teleconsult doctors and IT experts bring optimal efficiency to your  workflow. A thorough analysis of your current situation, needs and requirements results in a balanced work flow management plan.

Teleconsult does not have any volume requirement and you are in full control to decide when to outsource studies to a Teleconsult doctor. To find out how your clinic or department will benefit from working with Teleconsult Europe, please contact us.

  • INCREASE YOUR SUBSPECIALTY OFFERINGS

  • Balance on- and off site tasks

  • INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY AND PROFITABILITY

  • MAXIMUM USE OF RADIOLOGY AND LABORATORY EQUIPMENT

  • 24/7/365 AVAILABILITY OF EXPERTISE

About Teleconsult

Founded in 2007 by Dutch radiologists, TeleConsult Europe (TCE) offers radiology services to hospitals, clinics, diagnostic centers, laboratories, medical services companies and the Dutch Government.

TCE’s mission is to provide its customers with tailored telemedicine solutions. Since its inception, TCE carefully listened to wishes and needs of its clients. This resulted in an array of interchangeable services providing radiology and pathology departments with high quality, cost efficient, flexible on- and off-site solutions.

Today TCE’s solutions consist of a combination of an on-site physician workforce, teleradiology, telepathology, and IT services. Our Western Board certified radiologists and pathologists perform reading services for a broad array of institutions varying from a 24/7 emergency reading service for hospitals and clinics, to screening services for the famous Dutch Breast Cancer Screening Program.

The primary objective of our highly trained physicians and staff is to enable our clients to provide optimal patient care and diagnostic services by placing quality and value first. Our synergetic modules provide tailored services to hospitals, clinics and imaging centers at any location on the globe. Whether you need an on-site physician, reports through telemedicine or a combination of both, we help you to realize an optimal and cost efficient workflow.

Methylene blue shows promise for improving short-term memory

A single oral dose of methylene blue results in an increased MRI-based response in brain areas that control short-term memory and attention, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

Methylene blue is used to treat methemoglobinemia, a blood disorder in which oxygen is unable to release effectively to body tissues, and as a surgical stain.

Animal studies have shown a single low dose of methylene blue enhances long-term contextual memory - the conscious recall of the source and circumstances of a specific memory - and extinction memory, a process in which a conditioned response from stimuli gradually diminishes over time.

"Although the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue were shown in rodents in the 1970s, the underlying neuronal changes in the brain responsible for memory improvement and the effects of methylene blue on short-term memory and sustained-attention tasks have not been investigated," said study author Timothy Q. Duong, Ph.D., from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas. "Our team decided to conduct the first multi-modal MRI study of methylene blue in humans."

Twenty-six healthy participants, between the ages of 22 and 62, were enrolled in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to measure the effects of methylene blue on the human brain during working-memory and sustained-attention tasks. This study was approved by the local ethical committee.

The participants underwent functional MRI (fMRI) before and one hour after low-dose methylene blue or placebo administration to evaluate the potential effects of methylene blue on cerebrovascular reactivity during tasks. Mean cerebral blood flow was measured pre- and post-intervention.

The results showed methylene blue increased response in the bilateral insular cortex - an area deep within the brain associated with emotional responses - during a task that measured reaction time to a visual stimulus. The fMRI results also showed an increased response during short-term memory tasks involving the brain's prefrontal cortex, which controls processing of memories, the parietal lobe, primarily associated with the processing of sensory information, and the occipital cortex, the visual processing center of the brain. In addition, methylene blue was associated with a 7 percent increase in correct responses during memory retrieval.

The findings suggest that methylene blue can regulate certain brain networks related to sustained attention and short-term memory after a single oral low dose.

"This work certainly provides a foundation for future trials of methylene blue in healthy aging, cognitive impairment, dementia and other conditions that might benefit from drug-induced memory enhancement," Dr. Duong said.

Article: Multimodal Randomized Functional MR Imaging of the Effects of Methylene Blue in the Human Brain, Pavel Rodriguez, MD , Wei Zhou, BS , Douglas W. Barrett, PhD , Wilson Altmeyer, MD , Juan E. Gutierrez, MD , Jinqi Li, MD , Jack L. Lancaster, PhD , Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, PhD , Timothy Q. Duong, PhD, Radiology, doi: 10.1148/radiol.2016152893, published online 28 June 2016.



Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

Methylene blue shows promise for improving short-term memory

A single oral dose of methylene blue results in an increased MRI-based response in brain areas that control short-term memory and attention, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology.

Methylene blue is used to treat methemoglobinemia, a blood disorder in which oxygen is unable to release effectively to body tissues, and as a surgical stain.

Animal studies have shown a single low dose of methylene blue enhances long-term contextual memory - the conscious recall of the source and circumstances of a specific memory - and extinction memory, a process in which a conditioned response from stimuli gradually diminishes over time.

"Although the memory-enhancing effects of methylene blue were shown in rodents in the 1970s, the underlying neuronal changes in the brain responsible for memory improvement and the effects of methylene blue on short-term memory and sustained-attention tasks have not been investigated," said study author Timothy Q. Duong, Ph.D., from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas. "Our team decided to conduct the first multi-modal MRI study of methylene blue in humans."

Twenty-six healthy participants, between the ages of 22 and 62, were enrolled in a double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to measure the effects of methylene blue on the human brain during working-memory and sustained-attention tasks. This study was approved by the local ethical committee.

The participants underwent functional MRI (fMRI) before and one hour after low-dose methylene blue or placebo administration to evaluate the potential effects of methylene blue on cerebrovascular reactivity during tasks. Mean cerebral blood flow was measured pre- and post-intervention.

The results showed methylene blue increased response in the bilateral insular cortex - an area deep within the brain associated with emotional responses - during a task that measured reaction time to a visual stimulus. The fMRI results also showed an increased response during short-term memory tasks involving the brain's prefrontal cortex, which controls processing of memories, the parietal lobe, primarily associated with the processing of sensory information, and the occipital cortex, the visual processing center of the brain. In addition, methylene blue was associated with a 7 percent increase in correct responses during memory retrieval.

The findings suggest that methylene blue can regulate certain brain networks related to sustained attention and short-term memory after a single oral low dose.

"This work certainly provides a foundation for future trials of methylene blue in healthy aging, cognitive impairment, dementia and other conditions that might benefit from drug-induced memory enhancement," Dr. Duong said.

Article: Multimodal Randomized Functional MR Imaging of the Effects of Methylene Blue in the Human Brain, Pavel Rodriguez, MD , Wei Zhou, BS , Douglas W. Barrett, PhD , Wilson Altmeyer, MD , Juan E. Gutierrez, MD , Jinqi Li, MD , Jack L. Lancaster, PhD , Francisco Gonzalez-Lima, PhD , Timothy Q. Duong, PhD, Radiology, doi: 10.1148/radiol.2016152893, published online 28 June 2016.



Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed

Healthcare providers do not fully understand cancer risk from CT scans

Knowledge of radiation dose and associated risks varies among referring physicians, radiologists, and technicians, according to a new study in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences.

Computed tomography (CT) scans are an invaluable diagnostic tool in modern medicine, but they do come at a price: exposing patients to potentially dangerous ionizing radiation. Doctors and other healthcare professionals may not be fully aware of a CT scan's effect on lifetime malignancy risk. A new study in the Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences surveyed doctors, radiologists, and imaging technologists regarding their beliefs about radiation exposure from CT. The survey found that while most respondents recognized there is an increased risk of cancer from CT, many underestimated the actual radiation dose.

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan wanted to assess healthcare providers' knowledge regarding radiation dosing from CT scans. Using a survey of medical professionals in Saskatchewan, investigators found that 73% of physicians, 97% of radiologists, and 76% of technologists correctly identified that there is an increased cancer risk from one abdominal-pelvic CT. However, only 18% of physicians, 28% of radiologists, and 22% of technologists were able to correctly identify the dose in relation to chest x-rays. Although 48% of physicians, 78% of radiologists and 63% of technologists either accurately estimated or overestimated this dose, many respondents underestimated the dose level.

"Underestimating radiation dose from a CT scan is more concerning than knowing the exact dose level, particularly when it is a vast underestimation, as this may lead to minimization of the risk estimate when considering a test," explained lead investigator David Leswick, MD, FRCPC, Department of Medical Imaging, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan).

The issue of radiation exposure is significant as doctors continue to order CT scans with increasing frequency. In Canada alone, there were an estimated 4.4 million CT scans conducted in 2011-2012. Measured in millisieverts (mSv), the average radiation dose from an abdominal-pelvic CT is 10 mSv, compared to 0.02 to 0.2 mSv from one chest x-ray, meaning that a radiation dose from a CT scan is best approximated as between that from 100-250 chest radiographs.

"Although risk from radiation dose levels in the range of medical imaging procedures is small, it is real as evidenced from atomic bomb survivors and nuclear industry workers showing significantly increased risk of malignancy after exposure to doses in the range of diagnostic CT," said Dr. Leswick. "The risk of fatal malignancy may be as high as 1 in 1000 for a 10-mSv exposure (approximate dose of an abdomen-pelvis CT). This risk is significant on a population basis, with up to 2% of cancers in the United States population possibly attributable to CT."

With such a clear risk relationship between radiation exposure and cancer, it is imperative that healthcare providers understand the facts to ensure the benefits outweigh the possible danger when ordering a diagnostic CT. The survey indicated that 93% of respondents were interested in radiation dose feedback when considering ordering a CT scan. Automated dose calculation software and radiology information systems can be integrated into electronic ordering, which would give doctors immediate access to information when considering ordering a scan.

Another interesting aspect highlighted by the survey was some confusion regarding radiation exposure from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound. MRIs and ultrasounds do not employ ionizing radiation and yet 20% of physicians, 6% of radiologists, and 7% of technologists attributed radiation exposure to MRIs and 11% of physicians, 0% of radiologists, and 7% of technologists believed an ultrasound used radiation. "Belief that ionizing radiation is utilized by ultrasound and MRI is troubling as it may result in underutilization of these imaging modalities because of unfounded radiation concerns," added Dr. Leswick.

While CT scans can be a lifesaving diagnostic tool, they also present a potential danger if they are overused or incorrectly implemented. It is vital that doctors and other healthcare practitioners fully understand the implications of ordering a CT scan and that patients are counseled appropriately about all available forms of testing and the potential radiation exposure involved.

"Unfortunately, healthcare providers including physicians, radiologists, and medical imaging technologists are often not aware of radiation doses for common CT scans," concluded Dr. Leswick. "It is important for healthcare professionals (including referring physicians, radiologists, and technologists) to be aware of radiation dose levels and risks from imaging tests for several reasons, including the ability to weigh the risks and benefits of tests, counsel patients on relevant risks, optimize protocols to minimize radiation dose, and select appropriate protocols to minimize radiation dose."

Article: Knowing the Enemy: Health Care Provider Knowledge of Computed Tomography Radiation Dose and Associated Risks, Breanne Irving, MBBS; David A Leswick, MD, FRCPC; Derek Fladeland, MD, FRCPC; Hyun Ja Lim, PhD; Rhonda Bryce, MD, MSc, doi: 10.1016/j.jmir.2016.05.003, Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, published online 22 June 2016.



Powered By WizardRSS.com | Full Text RSS Feed