teleconsult

Teleradiology

Designing and delivering teleradiology services which meet your specific requirements is our forte. Our Board Certified radiologists offer preliminary, final and subspecialty reports 24/7/365. Turnaround times are set to match your needs. Our technical support center provides state of the art PACS/RIS and communication technology, which securely integrates with your current Information Systems.

Telepathology

Teleconsult pathologists offer services ranging from remote reporting of cyto- and histological cases, to lab design and quality assurance programs. We support the most basic lab set ups with second opinions and on-line consultations, and connect more advanced labs to our web based telepathology platform for routine reporting of diverse cases.

Telemicrobiology

Our telemicrobiology services are offered by Dutch and UK Board Certified clinical microbiologists with sub-specialties in the fields of general microbiology, bacteriology, virology, parasitology, mycology, molecular diagnostics and epidemiology. Our clinical microbiologists are mainly active in clinical hospital settings, keeping them closely connected and in tune with daily clinical situations and challenges. This creates affinity with remote cases and ensures the up-to-date knowledge our customers require.

Locum Placement

Our recruitment division recruits certified radiologists, pathologists and micro biologists for part time and full time positions. In our 15 year history we successfully recruited and placed medical specialists in over 60 hospitals and clinics across the globe

Screening & Trials

From its worldwide network of Board Certified medical specialists, TeleConsult creates subspecialty teams for specific screening and clinical trial assignments. In 2012 TeleConsult’s dedicated breast radiologists were selected by the Dutch Breast Cancer Screening program to interpret its screening mammography studies.

We are hiring

We recruit, select and place sub-specialty, EU educated and certified radiologists, pathologists and microbiologists for short and long term positions. Our reputation has been built on a foundation of providing highly skilled doctors and the following core values: Professionalism, Value for money, Quality, Reliability and Integrity. Interested in joining our team? Register now!

Specialist care at your fingertips

Whether you are a hospital  department, diagnostic center or laboratory, Teleconsult doctors and IT experts bring optimal efficiency to your  workflow. A thorough analysis of your current situation, needs and requirements results in a balanced work flow management plan.

Teleconsult does not have any volume requirement and you are in full control to decide when to outsource studies to a Teleconsult doctor. To find out how your clinic or department will benefit from working with Teleconsult Europe, please contact us.

  • INCREASE YOUR SUBSPECIALTY OFFERINGS

  • Balance on- and off site tasks

  • INCREASE PRODUCTIVITY AND PROFITABILITY

  • MAXIMUM USE OF RADIOLOGY AND LABORATORY EQUIPMENT

  • 24/7/365 AVAILABILITY OF EXPERTISE

About Teleconsult

Founded in 2007 by Dutch radiologists, TeleConsult Europe (TCE) offers radiology services to hospitals, clinics, diagnostic centers, laboratories, medical services companies and the Dutch Government.

TCE’s mission is to provide its customers with tailored telemedicine solutions. Since its inception, TCE carefully listened to wishes and needs of its clients. This resulted in an array of interchangeable services providing radiology and pathology departments with high quality, cost efficient, flexible on- and off-site solutions.

Today TCE’s solutions consist of a combination of an on-site physician workforce, teleradiology, telepathology, and IT services. Our Western Board certified radiologists and pathologists perform reading services for a broad array of institutions varying from a 24/7 emergency reading service for hospitals and clinics, to screening services for the famous Dutch Breast Cancer Screening Program.

The primary objective of our highly trained physicians and staff is to enable our clients to provide optimal patient care and diagnostic services by placing quality and value first. Our synergetic modules provide tailored services to hospitals, clinics and imaging centers at any location on the globe. Whether you need an on-site physician, reports through telemedicine or a combination of both, we help you to realize an optimal and cost efficient workflow.

Markers that cause toxic radiotherapy side-effects in prostate cancer identified

A new study involving researchers from The University of Manchester looked at the genetic information of more than 1,500 prostate cancer patients and identified two variants linked to increased risk of radiotherapy side-effects.

Nearly 50% of the 1.1 million men a year worldwide diagnosed with prostate cancer undergo radiotherapy. It is an effective treatment, but between 10 and 50 percent of men suffer from radiotherapy side-effects which can cause long-term problems with urinating or rectal bleeding.

It is not known why some men are more susceptible to side-effects and as a result doses are kept low to minimise the risk in all patients - reducing the effectiveness of treatment. The new Radiogenomics Consortium study coordinated from Manchester aimed to identify if there were any genetic markers which could explain this.

Genetic profiling was carried out on 1,564 patients from four centres based in Europe and North America. It examined genetic variants described as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which form part of the subunits of DNA.

Two years after the radiotherapy, 17.8% of the group had suffered from rectal bleeding, 15% an increase in urinary frequency and 8.1% a decrease in urine stream.

Professor of Radiation Biology, Catharine West from The University of Manchester's Institute of Cancer Sciences led the research. She said: "The first studies into SNPs were smaller. We needed to show we could combine them to increase the number of patients investigated and improve our ability to identify genetic variants. Centres give radiotherapy in different ways and we needed to show this variability was not a problem."

The two variants found were associated with an increased frequency of urinating and a decreased flow of urine.

The causes for the associations are unclear, but the two SNPs identified are located in the regions of genes that are expressed in tissues exposed to radiation.

The results show radiotherapy cohorts can be combined and larger studies should identify enough variants to develop a test to predict a cancer patient's risk of radiotherapy side-effects.

Professor West added: "There are currently more than 32 million people alive five years after having cancer, so the side-effects of their treatment are an important issue for them. If we can develop a test that means people can reduce the risk of these problems that will be of huge benefit to this group."

Article: Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer, Kerns SL, Dorling L, Fachal L et al., EBioMedicine, doi:10.1016/j.ebiom.2016.07.022, published online 20 July 2016.



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Radiologists do not face elevated risk of radiation-related mortality

Radiologists who graduated from medical school after 1940 do not face an increased risk of dying from radiation-related causes like cancer, according to a new study appearing online in the journal Radiology. Researchers said the findings point to the success of efforts to reduce occupational radiation doses over the past several decades.

Studies of mortality among radiologists are important for evaluating radiation protection measures and understanding the long-term effects of protracted exposure to low level radiation. Previous U.S. studies have been limited by smaller data sets and reflect only earlier time periods. In the United States, the last follow-up of radiologists ended in 1975, leaving a large gap in understanding the risks today.

Study leader Amy Berrington de González, D.Phil., chief of the Radiation Epidemiology Branch at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in Bethesda, Md., and her colleagues based the new study on records from the American Medical Association (AMA) Physician Masterfile, a database established in 1906 that has grown to include current and historical data for more than 1.4 million physicians, residents and medical students in the United States.

They compared cancer incidence and mortality rates between 43,763 radiologists and 64,990 psychiatrists who graduated from medical school between 1916 and 2006. Psychiatrists were chosen as a comparison group because they are unlikely to have had occupational radiation exposure.

"There's been a big change in practice over the past few decades, with more doctors performing fluoroscopically-guided procedures, making it more and more difficult to find a physician comparison group that did not have exposure to radiation," noted Martha Linet, M.D., study coauthor and senior investigator at the NCI Radiation Epidemiology Branch.

Overall, male radiologists who graduated after 1940 had a better health profile than that of their psychiatrist colleagues. The death rate for radiologists from all causes was lower and there was no evidence of increased mortality from radiation-related causes such as cancer or cardiovascular disease.

"Our most important finding is that radiologists have lower death rates from all causes of death combined, compared to psychiatrists, and had similar risks of cancer deaths overall," Dr. Linet said.

In contrast, radiologists who graduated before 1940 faced increased death rates from certain conditions, including acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, which are known to be related to occupational radiation exposure. In these earliest workers, there were also increased death rates from melanoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

The older radiologists also had a higher risk of cerebrovascular disease. Research in the last few years has found evidence that low to moderate doses of radiation may be associated with circulatory diseases and stroke.

The reduced health risks for more recent radiology graduates are likely due to developments and improvements in radiation protection and monitoring, according to the researchers, along with improvements in equipment safety.

"Most of the findings of increased risk were in the earlier radiologists," Dr. Linet said. "We do feel there is evidence that decreases in dose in the United States and other countries seem to have paid off, reducing risks in recent graduates."

Article: Long-term Mortality in 43,763 U.S. Radiologists Compared with 64,990 U.S. Psychiatrists, Amy Berrington de González, DPhil , Estelle Ntowe, MS , Cari M. Kitahara, PhD , Ethel Gilbert, PhD , Donald L. Miller, MD , Ruth A. Kleinerman, MPH, Martha S. Linet, MD, Radiology, doi: 10.1148/radiol.2016152472, published online 19 July 2016.



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"Dense breasts" diagnosis varies widely among radiologists

The likelihood of a woman being told she has dense breasts varies substantially according to which radiologist interprets her mammogram. These findings, published in Annals of Internal Medicine, have policy implications with regard to supplemental screening strategies.

Having dense breasts makes it more difficult to interpret mammography results and is also an independent risk factor for developing breast cancer. To ensure that women with dense breasts are aware of the limitations of mammography and their increased risk for cancer, about half of U.S. states currently have breast density notification laws and some of those states require that women are advised to talk to their health care providers about supplemental screening. Such laws are controversial because of the large number of women affected and because the lack of consensus in the medical community regarding supplemental screening strategies. An additional concern is the subjective nature of breast density assessment, which is based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) that provides four possible categories for breast density.

Using data from 30 radiology facilities within the three breast cancer screening research centers of the Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens (PROSPR) consortium, researchers sought to examine variations in the distribution of breast density assessment across radiologists as recorded in clinical practice. They also accounted for factors known to be associated with breast density. The researchers found a wide variation among radiologists in the percentage of mammograms rated as showing dense breasts (ranging from 6.3 percent to 84.5 percent), which persisted after adjustment for patient factors. In addition, more than 1 in 6 women with consecutive mammograms interpreted by different radiologists during a short period were reclassified into dense versus nondense categories. According to the researchers, this variation has important implications for debates about mandatory notification laws.



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