Designing and delivering teleradiology services which meet your specific requirements is our forte. Our Board Certified radiologists offer preliminary, final and subspecialty reports 24/7/365. Turnaround times are set to match your needs. Our technical support center provides state of the art PACS/RIS and communication technology, which securely integrates with your current Information Systems.


Teleconsult pathologists offer services ranging from remote reporting of cyto- and histological cases, to lab design and quality assurance programs. We support the most basic lab set ups with second opinions and on-line consultations, and connect more advanced labs to our web based telepathology platform for routine reporting of diverse cases.


Our telemicrobiology services are offered by Dutch and UK Board Certified clinical microbiologists with sub-specialties in the fields of general microbiology, bacteriology, virology, parasitology, mycology, molecular diagnostics and epidemiology. Our clinical microbiologists are mainly active in clinical hospital settings, keeping them closely connected and in tune with daily clinical situations and challenges. This creates affinity with remote cases and ensures the up-to-date knowledge our customers require.

Locum Placement

Our recruitment division recruits certified radiologists, pathologists and micro biologists for part time and full time positions. In our 15 year history we successfully recruited and placed medical specialists in over 60 hospitals and clinics across the globe

Screening & Trials

From its worldwide network of Board Certified medical specialists, TeleConsult creates subspecialty teams for specific screening and clinical trial assignments. In 2012 TeleConsult’s dedicated breast radiologists were selected by the Dutch Breast Cancer Screening program to interpret its screening mammography studies.

We are hiring

We recruit, select and place sub-specialty, EU educated and certified radiologists, pathologists and microbiologists for short and long term positions. Our reputation has been built on a foundation of providing highly skilled doctors and the following core values: Professionalism, Value for money, Quality, Reliability and Integrity. Interested in joining our team? Register now!

Specialist care at your fingertips

Whether you are a hospital  department, diagnostic center or laboratory, Teleconsult doctors and IT experts bring optimal efficiency to your  workflow. A thorough analysis of your current situation, needs and requirements results in a balanced work flow management plan.

Teleconsult does not have any volume requirement and you are in full control to decide when to outsource studies to a Teleconsult doctor. To find out how your clinic or department will benefit from working with Teleconsult Europe, please contact us.


  • Balance on- and off site tasks




About Teleconsult

Founded in 2007 by Dutch radiologists, TeleConsult Europe (TCE) offers radiology services to hospitals, clinics, diagnostic centers, laboratories, medical services companies and the Dutch Government.

TCE’s mission is to provide its customers with tailored telemedicine solutions. Since its inception, TCE carefully listened to wishes and needs of its clients. This resulted in an array of interchangeable services providing radiology and pathology departments with high quality, cost efficient, flexible on- and off-site solutions.

Today TCE’s solutions consist of a combination of an on-site physician workforce, teleradiology, telepathology, and IT services. Our Western Board certified radiologists and pathologists perform reading services for a broad array of institutions varying from a 24/7 emergency reading service for hospitals and clinics, to screening services for the famous Dutch Breast Cancer Screening Program.

The primary objective of our highly trained physicians and staff is to enable our clients to provide optimal patient care and diagnostic services by placing quality and value first. Our synergetic modules provide tailored services to hospitals, clinics and imaging centers at any location on the globe. Whether you need an on-site physician, reports through telemedicine or a combination of both, we help you to realize an optimal and cost efficient workflow.

Researchers discover how immune cells resist radiation treatment

Researchers at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered a key mechanism by which radiation treatment (radiotherapy) fails to completely destroy tumors. And, in the journal Nature Immunology, they offer a novel solution to promote successful radiotherapy for the millions of cancer patients who are treated with it.

The team found that when radiotherapy damages skin harboring tumors, special skin immune cells called Langerhans cells are activated. These Langerhans cells can uniquely repair the damage in their own DNA caused by radiotherapy, allowing them to become resistant to radiotherapy and to even trigger an immune response causing skin tumors such as melanoma, to resist further treatment

Investigators mimicked the effect of immunotherapy drugs called "immune checkpoint inhibitors" to boost the immune system to attack tumors. This in turn blocked the ability of Langerhans cells to repair their own DNA after radiotherapy causing them to die, preventing an immune response that protects skin tumors.

"Our study suggests that this combination approach -- combining radiotherapy with drugs that rev up a healthy immune response -- will help make radiation therapy much more effective," says the study's lead author, immunologist Jeremy Price, PhD.

While this study was conducted using mouse models of melanoma and focused on the skin where these Langerhans cells are located, the researchers believe the same process happens in organs throughout the body. There, cousins of Langerhans cells called dendritic cells are also activated by radiotherapy and the investigators stressed that it is critical we understand how they respond to treatment as well.

"Similarly, checkpoint-inhibiting drugs have revolutionized the treatment of melanoma and are being investigated in many other cancers," said co-author Miriam Merad, MD, PhD, Professor of Tumor Immunology, Oncological Sciences, and Hematology and Medical Oncology at The Tisch Cancer Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "Cancer has the ability to turn off and even evade the body's natural immune response to tumors -- the new immunotherapy drugs take the brakes off the immune system, promoting a powerful and complete immune response to the cancer."

"This is synergized by the addition of radiation, which can expose the tumor so it can better be targeted by the immune system," says Dr. Price. "By combining these treatments, the ability of Langerhans cells to use the immune system to protect cancers will be overwhelmed."

Ionizing radiation is a powerful therapeutic tool that causes toxic breaks in cellular DNA. The formation of these breaks triggers a response in Langerhans cells (which are usually dormant) to stop further damage and to repair the breaks.

The researchers discovered that when the skin is damaged by ionizing radiation, Langerhans cells travel to nearby lymph nodes to communicate with other immune cells and help program a population of "regulatory" T cells that dampen the immune system. These regulatory T cells then travel back to the damaged tumor, and shield it from attack by the immune system.

"We found melanoma grew much more quickly on mice pretreated with radiation, compared to untreated mice, because of the presence of regulatory T cells activated by Langerhans cells," Dr. Price says. "These Langerhans cells were resistant to radiation."

The researchers also discovered that Langerhans cells are able to resist lethal doses of radiation because they express very high levels of an important protein involved in the stressresponse that orchestrates DNA repair after radiotherapy.

"Any treatment that prevents tumor infiltrating regulatory T cells from being produced, such as immunotherapy, will improve the outcome from radiation treatment -- and that will save lives," Dr. Price added.

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New ASTRO template helps radiation oncologists guide cancer survivors through ongoing care

A new template published by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) standardizes and streamlines the creation of patient-focused plans for long-term cancer survivor care following radiation therapy (RT). As the number of cancer patients and survivors in the U. S. continues to grow - the American Cancer Society predicts a 37 percent increase in the number of cancer patients surviving five years or longer over the next decade - so does the need for greater attention to long-term survivorship care.

The template and related research papers, "Development of a Standard Survivorship Care Plan for Radiation Oncologists" and "U.S. Radiation Oncology Practice Patterns for Post-Treatment Survivor Care," are published in Practical Radiation Oncology (PRO), the official clinical journal of ASTRO. The template was developed to coordinate post-treatment care for cancer survivors among the various contributors to their care, including primary care providers (PCPs) and oncology specialists (radiation, medical and surgical), as well as patients themselves.

"Factors such as earlier detection of cancer, increasingly effective treatment options, and an aging population lead to a growing number of cancer survivors and, ultimately, a need to educate and empower these individuals for their ongoing care," said ASTRO chair Bruce D. Minsky, MD, FASTRO. "The ASTRO template is designed to foster better coordination of post-treatment care for cancer survivors, including greater clarity in the dialogue between radiation oncologists and PCPs for issues such as less common side effects that may appear well after treatment is complete."

The framework also enables practices to meet new accreditation requirements set by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC). In response to a 2006 recommendation from the Institutes of Medicine that cancer patients be provided with a survivorship care plan (SCP) following treatment, CoC issued a mandate that cancer programs provide SCPs for all curative cancer patients by 2019 to maintain accreditation.

The new CoC requirement may necessitate changes for the majority of radiation oncology programs, according to data from a March 2014 survey of ASTRO members, which include nearly all practicing radiation oncologists in the U.S. The survey found that only 40 percent and 19 percent of respondents used SCPs for curative and palliative patients, respectively. Primary barriers to implementation included cost and the lack of a standardized, comprehensive SCP framework suited to patients who received RT. Nearly 80 percent of the RT providers that reported using SCPs relied on a framework developed internally within their practice, indicating that different patients may receive different types of information depending on where they receive treatment.

"This two-page template facilitates consistency in SCPs across the discipline and also reduces the time and effort required by providers to complete each individual plan," said Ronald Chen, MD, MPH, an associate professor in radiation oncology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and lead author on the manuscript that includes the template. "The field of radiation oncology has a long tradition of creating treatment summaries for each patient, even before the Institute of Medicine recommended survivorship care plans in 2006. This radiation-oncology specific template will serve a dual purpose as both a traditional radiation oncology treatment summary and a plan for survivorship care that meets CoC requirements - thus reducing the burden on radiation oncologists from having to create two documents for each patient." Chen was the chair of ASTRO's Clinical, Translational and Basic Science Advisory Committee, the group that examined current adoption levels of SCPs and developed the template to standardize them in the future.

While many radiation oncologists provide their patients with follow-up material such as diagnosis and treatment summaries, contacts for ancillary services such as financial or nutritional counselling, and information on potential late treatment effects, the SCP template coordinates these components in a central, plain language document. The template includes both elements required by CoC in SCPs, namely a summary of past treatment and directions for future care. The treatment summary outlines the survivor's diagnosis and stage information; treatment details such as the site, dosage and schedule of RT; and contact information for providers who delivered the treatment. The plan for follow-up care covers anticipated toxicities from RT, expected course of recovery from treatment-related toxicities, possible functional and/or social limitations, recommendations for preventative measures and behaviors, cancer information resources, and referrals to supportive care providers.

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New cervical brachytherapy technique could improve treatment outcomes by increasing radiation dose to tumors, decreasing toxicity

A new brachytherapy technique using a shield that rotates in a corkscrew pattern inside a tube-shaped intrauterine applicator could improve cervical cancer treatments, boosting the radiation dose while sparing the healthy tissue around it. Researchers report on the technique in the current issue of Medical Physics, the monthly journal of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the professional organization of medical physicists, who ensure radiation therapy and imaging procedures are safe and effective.

Current cervical brachytherapy technology involves depositing doses of radiation directly in tumors using sources that emit radiation nearly uniformly around the source. This limits the ability to personalize treatment as the physician may be unable to deliver a desired tumor dose due to limitations imposed by nearby healthy tissues such as the bladder, colon and rectum.

The new technique improves upon the current technology by fitting a rotating shield to the source catheter that delivers the radiation to the tumor. The shield rotates around the radiation source following grooves in the inner wall of the applicator that are shaped like a series of corkscrews (helixes). This new method would allow physicians to provide patients personalized radiation therapy by choosing different grooves to guide treatment and rotating the shield to block the radiation from reaching healthy tissues.

"The multihelix rotating shield delivery technique could enable physicians to deliver doses of radiation to tumors with a degree of conformity that is not possible with conventional, unshielded brachytherapy sources," said Ryan T. Flynn, Ph.D., the corresponding author and director of medical physics at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. "The resulting treatment would be more targeted, less toxic and could improve cervical cancer therapy."

Researchers simulated the delivery of the dose distribution with the proposed technique based on imaging and data of five women with cervical cancer who were treated with external beam radiation therapy and conventional brachytherapy methods. The team found the multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy method to be technically feasible to deliver, and determined that a higher radiation dose could be delivered to the tumor than is possible with conventional techniques without exceeding the tolerance doses of the the bladder, rectum and colon. The goal of the research team is to build a prototype of the multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy system and begin clinical trials in women in several years, Dr. Flynn said.

"This shows significant promise of a future in which women with cervical cancer could receive safer, more effective cancer treatment," said M. Saiful Huq, Ph.D., chair of the AAPM Science Council Therapy Physics Committee and professor and director of medical physics at University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and UPMC CancerCenter. "The cutting-edge science demonstrates the leading role medical physicists play in pushing the envelope to continually improve patient care."

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